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You are watching: The frost is on the pumpkin

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Autumn in all its glory has lastly arrived approximately here, complete with cold, clear nights and also cool, clean days, and also "the falling pipeline drift by mine window; the autumn leaves that red and gold". And for the previous two nights, we"ve had frost end night. Which put me in psychic of this poem, the opened line of which mine grandmother provided to reference when the an initial frosts came. I gain the way the poet revelled in wordplay, consciously choosing folksy spellings and also playing through rhyme. This one is really funny to read aloud.When the Frost is ~ above the Punkinby James Whitcomb RileyWhen the frost is top top the punkin and the fodder"s in the shock, and you listen the kyouck and also gobble of the struttin" turkey-cock, and also the clackin" that the guineys, and also the cluckin" of the hens, and the rooster"s hallylooyer as he tiptoes on the fence; O, it"s then the time a feller is a-feelin" in ~ his best, through the risin" sun to greet that from a night of calm rest, as he leaves the house, bareheaded, and goes the end to feeding the stock, as soon as the frost is ~ above the punkin and also the fodder"s in the shock. They"s other kindo" harty-like around the atmusfere when the warmth of summer"s over and the coolin" fall is here— Of course we miss out on the flowers, and the flower on the trees, and also the mumble that the hummin"-birds and also buzzin" of the bees; but the air"s for this reason appetizin"; and also the landscape with the fog Of a crisp and sunny morning the the airly loss days Is a pictur" that no painter has the colorin" come mock— once the frost is on the punkin and the fodder"s in the shock. The husky, rusty russel that the tossels the the corn, and the raspin" the the tangled leaves as gold as the morn; The stubble in the furries—kindo" lonesome-like, but still A-preachin" sermuns to us of the barns they growed to fill; The strawstack in the medder, and the reaping machine in the shed; The hosses in theyr stalls below—the clover overhead!— O, that sets my hart a-clickin" choose the tickin" the a clock, once the frost is top top the punkin and the fodder"s in the shock. Then her apples every is gethered, and also the ones a feller keeps Is poured around the cellar-floor in red and also yaller heaps; and also your cider-makin"s over, and your wimmern-folks is with With theyr mince and apple-butter, and theyr souse and also sausage too!... Ns don"t know just how to call it—but ef together a thing might be as the angels wantin" boardin", and they"d call around on me— I"d want to "commodate "em—all the whole-indurin" flock— once the frost is ~ above the punkin and the fodder"s in the shock.A word about the poemIt"s created in rhymed couplets, through the last couplet pair forming a stop of sorts by always rhyming through "shock". The is told in a rollicking metre (the lines all have fifteen or, occasionally, fourteen, syllables to them, and are in the nature that fourteeners. In situation you"re wondering, a "shock" is (according to my Oxford English recommendation Dictionary): "a group of usu. Twelve corn-sheaves stood up through their heads together in a field." the word "medder" is "meadow," "furries" is a derivative of "furrows", "wimmern" is "women". A word about the poetJames Whitcomb Riley to be born in Indiana in 1849, and also died in 1916. That was well-known as "the Hoosier poet" because that his decision to compose poems using the language of main Indiana at the time. The was also known as "the Children"s Poet" because that his collection of works published under the name of "Benjamin F. Johnson, the Boone", dubbed The Old Swimmin" Hole and "Leven an ext Poems. He likewise wrote a poem dubbed "Little Orphant Allie" that came to be widely well-known (after a typesetter"s error) as "Little Orphant Annie". Riley uncovered acclaim during his life, touring the nation as a lecturer, being invited to the White House, and winning national honors. His poems have, for the many part, fallen the end of donate in contemporary times, although some of them are still teach in Indiana schools. Yet in my opinion, this one is a gem worth sharing.
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